The Local View ? Neighbourhood Cinemas and Alternative Film Projects

Many small neighbourhood cinemas invested in the future. The digital options for showing films are opening up new vistas for alternative projects. Not all of them are legal.... more more

GoetheInstitute

From the Feuilletons

Saturday 26 January - Friday 1 February, 2008

Internet activist Alex Au-Waipang explains how the Singapore government encourages people to exercise self-censorship on the net. We meet the maniac New Yorker who is bringing intellectual substance to the city's night life. Historian Götz Aly accuses the German 68ers of side-stepping their Nazi past instead of confronting it. Novelist and lawyer Juli Zeh has filed a legal complaint against the biometric passport. And Nikolai Tokarev has put the manliness back into Mozart.
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From the Feuilletons

Friday 25 January, 2008

Jan Philipp Reemtsma explains the uncanny glee of autotelic violence. Ulrich Beck explains that the national state is also being heated up by climate change. Apples but no nudes fill Cairo's Academy of Fine Art. Flemish novelist Saskia de Coster proffers an unusual roadmap for peace in Belgium. And juvenile deliquency continues to provoke journalistic mud-slinging.
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From the Feuilletons

Friday 18 January, 2008

The German debate on youth violence has been catapulted into the extremes. Daniel Barenboim comes in for some stinging criticism in die Welt. Andre Glucksmann underscores his laicist convictions with some statistics. Writer Peter Schneider sees a failing state behind Naples' burning mountains of rubbish. A new Russian media surveillance office looks very much like a censorship authority. And Chechnyan human rights activist Zainap Gashaeva tells of Grosny's forgotten suffering.
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From the Feuilletons

Friday 11 January, 2008

Kenyan writer David G. Maillu proposes a new parliamentary system for his country – based on age and sex. Romanian author Mircea Cartarescu reveals the source of his nightmarish fantasies. Filmmaker Claude Chabrol says society is one big bourgeoisie. The Camorra is cleaning up with Naples' rubbish. And the SZ looks at business correspondence of extortionists.
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From the Feuilletons

Friday 4 January, 2008

Julia Fischer demonstrated spectacular dual talents in the Frankfurt Oper. Gabriele Goettle describes the dawn of the Gypsy pogrom mood in Italy. Our heritage culture is necrophiliac, according to historian Philipp Blom. Merve Verlag's book titles are as beautiful as they are enigmatic, says publisher Peter Gente. And smokers in Hamburg want to be left to smoke and die with decency.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 22 - Friday 28 December, 2007

Writer Raoul Schrott reveals the secret about Homer. Gaudi's Sagrada Familia has as many enemies as ever. David Lynch has caused a scandal around the Devil's Mountain in Berlin. A recent study finds surprising similarities between German Muslims and German ultra-nationalists. Triest-based author Veit Heinichen says the next EU extension must include Croatia. And the NZZ looks at the Muslim art of celebrating wine.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 15 - Friday 21 December

Vladimir Putin's contribution to Russian stability is a deceptive western construct says the SZ. Tehran has addressed the Holocaust in a TV series. Thomas Langhoff has stripped Schiller's "Wallenstein" to the bone. Belarus is suffering from lunacy in loneliness. Timothy Garton-Ash squeezes out an apology for calling Ayaan Hirsi Ali an enlightenment fundamentalist. And comedian Olli Dittrich has got the Germans down to a tee - in electronic goods outlets.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 8 - Friday 14 December, 2007

Algerian writer Boualem Sansal opposes the regime, the Prophet and even Allah. Donald Tusk admits to a having a passion for Werner Herzog. Tariq Ramadan steers round a self-fulfilling prophecy. Faust, that washed-up entrepreneur from the former Communist Bloc, is everywhere in Eastern Germany nowadays. The SZ spits vitriol at the blogs and gay writers are taking on Poland at last.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 1 - Friday 7 November, 2007

Signandsight.com gets a pat on the back from the NZZ for encouraging transnational debate. Pianist Andras Schiff campaigns for the Bösendorfer and its Viennese accent. The SZ is concerned about moral concerns about CO2 emissions. Romanian filmmaker Cristian Mungiu explains why his country only has 35 cinemas. And the European Film Awards in Berlin would have been great if any of the prize winners had bothered to turn up.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 24 - Friday 30 November, 2007

We Romanians are to blame for the problem of the Roma, says novelist Mircea Cartarescu. Social integration rides on public transport, research into banlieue unrest has shown. The fun will go out of Polish politics without the malicious, petty Kaczynski twins, writes Andrzej Stasiuk. And pop is helping East Asians to embrace their shared cultural roots.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 17- Friday 23 November, 2007

Bernard-Henri Levy calls for European Union protection for Ayaan Hirsi Ali. We need another Susan Sontag, sighs Der Freitag. Russia's new literary hope is flourishing in the hostile environment of the Urals. Accordeonist Sebastian Claren transforms Eisenstein's "Potemkin" into musical close-ups and tracking shots. And die Welt remembers Sarkozy on the night of his election victory, gloomy as Napoleon after a pointless battle.
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From the Feuilletons

November 10 - 16, 2007

Italian writer Ugo Riccarelli defends Rome's Roma, who are living within reach of the light. Constitutional Court judge Udo di Fabio warns the West against destroying itself in the war on terror. 100 years after his birth, Claus von Stauffenberg is enjoying unprecendented popularity. Germany's striking train drivers have outstripped its managers in advancing the common good. And the Maastricht border zone is the Bermuda Triangle of stolen art.
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From the Feuilletons

Saturday 3 - Friday 9 November, 2007

Poet Durs Grünbein thanks the Poles for Solidarnosc. Polish author Wojciech Kuczok worries that his country is splitting in two. Author Jonathan Littell bemoans the trade-off of ideologies for iPods. Author Ingo Schulze looks a gift horse in the mouth. The Take That concert in Berlin was an unworldly triumph of pop-historical dimensions in mauve. And Paris' social science institutes will have to slum it in the banlieues.
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From the Feuilletons

October 27 - November 2, 2007

A 'Tsunami of youth' is overwhelming the theatre landscape in Poland and politically, a fresh wind is blowing. Italy's Catholics are in uproar about a scandal that has broken about their beloved Padre Pio. Büchner-Prize winner Martin Mosebach compares Saint-Just with Himmler in his acceptance speech. Filmmaker Enrique Sanchez Lansch picks apart a long-standing taboo: the Nazi past of the Berlin Philharmoniker. And Andre Glucksmann begs us to remember Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Russia's new Andrei Sakharov.
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From the Feuilletons

Friday 26 October, 2007

All the papers comment on a report by British journalist David Litchfield on the involvement of Margit von Batthyany - daughter of the German industrialist Thyssen family - in the World War II Rechnitz massacre. The taz sheds light on the difficult relationship between East German dramatist Heiner Müller and his West German politician father. And Die Zeit has heard Mark Andre's penetrating, sensual, anti-eloquent music at the Donaueschingen Musiktage.
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